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Tag Archives: lynching

Writer, Students to Present Conversation About Lynching

The upcoming presentation on February 5 is on the Bangor Daily News’ app and website. The Arkansas Humanities Council used Facebook to tout the far reaching impact of their grant, which funded our 2013 presentation at the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center.

The 1927 Project

Presentation Planned on Incident of Racial Violence

BANGOR, Maine – Police violence and lynching have been topics of recent news around the country, and may be found throughout U.S. history. On Thursday, February 5, five Orono High School students will join writer and historian Stephanie Harp for “The 1927 Project,” a presentation about an early 20th-century lynching in Little Rock, Arkansas. In […]

Introducing the LR 1927 Project

If you’ve read John Carter: Scapegoat for Anger and Inheriting Home: The Skeletons in Pa’s Closet, then you know about the 1927 Little Rock lynching and my connection to it. Or perhaps you’ve read about it on America’s Black Holocaust Museum. In October, I presented my one aspect of my history research at Without Sanctuary: […]

“Chair hangings imply hanging-in-effigy of president”

  The following appeared in the Bangor Daily News, 10/20/12. It also is highlighted on America’s Black Holocaust Museum. In recent weeks, homeowners in  Virginia, Texas, Colorado and Washington state have hung empty chairs from trees. This comes in the wake of actor Clint Eastwood’s empty chair speech at the Republican National Convention. Never mind […]

55 Years Ago Today

  Fifty-five years ago today, nine African American students – known as the Little Rock Nine – walked through the front doors of Little Rock Central High School, guarded by troops from the 101st Airborne. The arrival of the troops on September 24th, who were called in by President Dwight Eisenhower, was reported on the front […]

Strange Fruit

Every day I receive email alerts when the word “lynching” is used somewhere on the web. Since starting this alert in last August, I’ve been astounded at the number of times and places it shows up. I expected notices to be few, mostly concerned with early 20th-century U.S. history and on the websites of university […]