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Category Archives: news

“Chair hangings imply hanging-in-effigy of president”

  The following appeared in the Bangor Daily News, 10/20/12. It also is highlighted on America’s Black Holocaust Museum. In recent weeks, homeowners in  Virginia, Texas, Colorado and Washington state have hung empty chairs from trees. This comes in the wake of actor Clint Eastwood’s empty chair speech at the Republican National Convention. Never mind […]

“Without Sanctuary”

Just this morning, I’m happy to have received word that my proposal has been accepted to present at the “Without Sanctuary” conference about lynching in Charlotte, North Carolina, in October. Presented by the Center for the Study of the New South, the conference will bring together scholars, creative artists, and those interested in the causes […]

It’s Not Even Past

Writer William Faulkner knew what he was talking about when he said, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” Yesterday, the pronouncement by Boston Globe writer Jeff Jacoby that Rev. Fred Luter’s election to head the Southern Baptist Convention “proves” that racism is gone is a perfect example. As any non-white resident in […]

Converting the Baptists

If nothing else, Southern Baptists believe in conversion. The potential for individual change – to new ways thinking and new beliefs – is the bedrock of evangelicalism. These Baptists have just elected their first African American president, Rev. Fred Luter of New Orleans, and observers have to wonder to what extent the denomination has been […]

Connect and Learn

Whether by talking, writing, or “liking,” however and whenever people connect there are opportunities to learn from each other’s experiences. Conversations are happening out there, and the more we join in, the more we’ll learn, not only about others but about ourselves. To that end, Inheritance is on now on Facebook. Click HERE. And Twitter, […]

Inheriting Home

We inherit our first identities from our families, long before we’re old enough to create other identities for ourselves. But can we shed what we’ve inherited, or do we have to embrace it? Identity*Memory*Testimony was the theme of a conference in Portland, March 30-31, co-sponsored by the Maine Women Writers Collection, the Maine Women’s Studies […]

Little Rock, Arkansas, 1957

In September 1957, nine African American teenagers enrolled in Little Rock’s Central High School to integrate the city’s schools in the wake of the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. The “Little Rock Nine,” as they came to be called, were prevented from entering Central — first by a mob, then by the Arkansas […]

Strange Fruit

Every day I receive email alerts when the word “lynching” is used somewhere on the web. Since starting this alert in last August, I’ve been astounded at the number of times and places it shows up. I expected notices to be few, mostly concerned with early 20th-century U.S. history and on the websites of university […]