Skip to content

Category Archives: black history month

The 1927 Project

A Novel Takes Flight: The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd

When I was in graduate school studying U.S. history with a concentration in race relations and racial violence in the South, I remember making note of the names Sarah and Angelina Grimké, the antebellum abolitionist sisters from Charleston, South Carolina. Their story intrigued me: sisters of privilege who had turned against the system of enslavement […]

Little Rock, Arkansas, 1957

In September 1957, nine African American teenagers enrolled in Little Rock’s Central High School to integrate the city’s schools in the wake of the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. The “Little Rock Nine,” as they came to be called, were prevented from entering Central — first by a mob, then by the Arkansas […]

Strange Fruit

Every day I receive email alerts when the word “lynching” is used somewhere on the web. Since starting this alert in last August, I’ve been astounded at the number of times and places it shows up. I expected notices to be few, mostly concerned with early 20th-century U.S. history and on the websites of university […]

Black History Month

Years ago, a friend and professional colleague in Virginia asked me why white people only pay attention to African American history during Black History Month.  We shouldn’t.  We should pay attention to it all year because black history is inextricably interwoven with white history, U.S. history, North American history, and world history. It’s the history […]